Sports and adventures

The basic rules of tennis

Posted on November 24, 2008. Filed under: Sports and adventures |


Thinking of starting to play tennis? Tennis is a great sport that requires mental preparation and physical agility. The first part of being able to play the game properly is understanding the rules, and in this article, we’ll be discussing what are commonly agreed upon as the official rules of tennis. The rules that we will discuss are based on the provided courtesy of the International Tennis Federation.

THE COURT – Tennis should be played on a court that is built to certain specifications. The court should be 78 feet long. For a singles match, the court should be 27 feet in width, and for doubles matches, the court’s width should be 36 feet. The net should be composed of a net with a cord of metal cable supporting it at a height of 3 and a half feet. Service lines should be placed 21 feet from each side of the net, designating the area in which serving should be performed.

THE RACKET – The rackets used in tennis should only have one pair of crisscrossing strings. Vibration dampening devices are allowed on the rackets, but they can only be placed outside of the strings. No devices that incorporate batteries to help your play are allowed.

THE SCORING – Tennis is a unique game in that it has special names given to the various points awarded. When calling out the score, the person serving the ball should always say their score first. A score of zero is called out by saying ‘Love’, and from there, the points go to 15, 30, 40, and game. If both players get a score of 40, the game must become a tie-breaker, and a 40-40 score is announced by saying ‘Deuce’. In a ‘Deuce’ situation, if a player gets a point, they are said to have ‘Advantage’. If a player with an ‘Advantage’ gets another point, the game is over. If a player gets a point while the other has ‘Advantage’, the score is reset to ‘Deuce’. When a game is won, another game is begun until someone gets the best of 7 games. One catch is that they must win by two. If, at the end of 7 games, a player is up 4 to 3, another match must be held as winning by two is necessary. If a player takes the best of 7 games, winning by 2, they are said to have won the match.

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Tennis Shoes

Posted on November 17, 2008. Filed under: Sports and adventures |


When you were a kid you had at least two pair of shoes. One pair was your “good” one your mother referred to as your “dress shoes,” while the other pair was your “everyday” shoes, most probably of athletic nature. These shoes, specially designed for sporting activities, were given the generic name “athletic shoes,” which is still considered a category that consists of running, basketball and tennis footwear. Originally introduced as part of the sporting apparel, athletic shoes are now worn as part of a casual look. Going for a walk, running across the shore, or playing outdoor games, are examples of the instances that people of all ages select to wear them. But how did all begin and why do more and more different types of athletic shoes being produced?

It is much more than the supply and demand curve, but it all comes down to that. Modern sneakers have beginnings in various sports shoes. One ancestor is the expensive British upper-class footwear of the late 1800s, used for lawn tennis, cricket, croquet, and at the beach. While at the turn of the twentieth century, football and baseball players wore essentially the same shoe type as before, the leather high-topped lace-ups with leather soles and cleats, the need to have footwear that provided a good grip onto the ground was the reason why a variety of lightweight shoes were introduced. Special shoes that would allow runners to move and lead to positive results, like increasing their speed and thus, their competitiveness, were ordered. Thus, as the need for greater speed increased, so did the athletic shoes’ number and styles. By refining and improving the shoes’ traction, sportswear companies created a subcategory in sports apparel; the shoemaking industry that is now worth billions. The sneakers’ demand emerged as athletes drew spectators to games and scientists invented new ways to accelerate human limits and improve athletes’ scores.

The dictionary defines the athletic shoe or sneaker as “a sports shoe usually made of canvas and having soft rubber soles; also called tennis shoe.” As today, uppers can be of leather, nylon, canvas, plastic, or combinations of these, and the shoe bottom surface has come to include any type of natural or synthetic rubber soles, tennis shoes are not equivalent to any other type of athletic shoe types. Sure, the term “tennis shoes” has become a generic term for athletic shoes, but this should not give the wrong impression to people that all sports shoes are the same or that one should wear them interchangeably regardless of the game/sport played. Running shoes on a tennis court, for example, are a sprained or broken ankle waiting to happen. Running shoes are built with a thick, soft heel to maximize cushioning for straight-forward, heel-to-toe foot impacts. Playing tennis is all about sudden starts and stops, as well as moving quickly from side to side. The trouble is that, during extreme stopping, cornering, and pivoting, if the sneaker’s outsole is too rigid, the tennis player loses contact with the playing surface, which results in a loss of footing. In addition, since runners do not usually move sharply sideways, while “on the run,” the running shoe sole is totally unsuitable for the sideways movements a tennis player makes.

From Keds, which were the first tennis shoes in 1917, to today’s extraordinary designs and expensive advertising budgets, shoemakers continue to design shoes with an eye towards accommodating various types and shapes of feet. When one adds to this equation, the trendy variety of styles, the outcome speaks for itself. There is always an option available for our feet will feel comfortable while playing a friendly match of tennis.

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David Beckham ;))

Posted on November 14, 2008. Filed under: Sports and adventures |


David Beckham’s story starts out near London, where he was born to a family of Manchester United fans. Despite being so close to clubs like West Ham United, Arsenal or Chelsea, Beckham’s aim was always the Red Devils club. As luck would have it, on his fourteenth birthday, he was taken in the Manchester youth program, and he even starred next to the senior team…as a mascot.

Just 4 years later, he went on to play for Sir Alex Ferguson’s senior squad, but his performance still needed fine tuning, so he was loaned to Preston North End for a year, returning to Manchester with some match experience. He quickly gained his place in the squad, despite his young age and became one of Manchester’s most preeminent players during the following decade.

His most successful season with Manchester is undoubtedly 1999, when the club achieved the Treble (League, Cup and Champions League in the same season) and with David Beckham playing soccer like never before.

It’s around then that he “trademarked” his famous free kicks and crosses and seeing some footage of David Beckham in action during that period will shed all doubts as to whether or not his superstardom status has a solid basis in his playing style, or just his good looks.

David Beckham Biography – 1998 World Cup Incident

His career did have a few rough moments, the most notable one being in 1998 with the English national side, at that year’s World Cup. In the Second Round, where England would play Argentina, Beckham was taunted by Argentinean midfielder Diego Simeone and he responded with a swing towards the player, which earned him a red card for bad behavior on the pitch.

With England losing the match and being knocked out of the tournament, all blame fell on David Beckham, as the English newspapers put him against the wall and fired up some poisonous articles. Any other player would have stayed low, or even quit soccer, but David Beckham’s ambition brought him back to the top. His performance with Manchester the following year, earned him back the respect of his fans and the entire world.

David Beckham Biography – Real Madrid

By the time David Beckham moved to Real Madrid in 2003, he was already a well-known star on the international stage. In his four years with the Madrid club he managed to win the Spanish league once, but his performance was deemed poorer than what he was playing at Manchester.

Many attributed this loss of form due to the new system found at Real and the fact that at Madrid he wasn’t the “star” of the team anymore, since he was playing next to other internationally famous soccer players like Zinedine Zidane, Raul or Roberto Carlos.

David Beckham Biography – Los Angeles Galaxy

Moving to play in the United States for the Los Angeles Galaxy as of 2007 earned him one of the biggest contracts in the history of soccer and it was an offer David couldn’t have refused, despite the fact that the soccer level in the United States is not as high as the one practiced in Spain.

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10 Points To Check Before Buying A Motorcycle

Posted on October 18, 2007. Filed under: Sports and adventures |


Buying a new or used motorcycle is serious business. It needs thought and careful selection. A motorbike is sacred to many and just a vehicle to some. However no motorcycle buyer should be without a check list that will help him or her make a great selection.

10 musts before paying for a motorcycle:

1. Check it out and do so with a motorcyclist friend in tow. Check if the motorcycle is clean and straight down centerline and forks.

2. Take along a list of models and their pros and cons. Discuss the nuances with the friendly sales person.

3. Find out about gears, brakes, clutch, and all other mechanics.

4. Determine engine specifics and details of gas tank and wheels.

5. Ask about service and warranties.

6. Get details of accessories and other musts like helmets, rear view mirrors and so on.

7. Sit on a lot of bikes to get a feel of height and riding position.

8. Read up on bikes in discover Today’s Motorcycling. Get all the information on types of bikes, financing, bike care and more.

9. If you are new to motorcycles choose a light-weight bike rather than the coolest, sexiest bike that only pros can ride. New riders should aim for a four-cylinder of less than 600 cc or 75- cc for sports machines and 150cc for everyday use.

10. Ask about safety gear and budget for this too in the cost of the motorcycle. Use pants, helmet, gloves, and jacket meant for motorcycling.

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